Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Fiction Tuesday- The Language of Flowers



This is Vanessa Diffenbaugh's debut novel.

The Language of Flowers beautifully weaves past and present, creating a vivid portrait of an unforgettable woman whose gift for flowers helps her change the lives of others even as she struggles to overcome her own troubled past.

ROSE (purple) - enchantment


The Victorian language of flowers was used to convey romantic expressions: honeysuckle for devotion, asters for patience, and red roses for love. But for Victoria Jones, it’s been more useful in communicating grief, mistrust, and solitude. After a childhood spent in the foster-care system, she is unable to get close to anybody, and her only connection to the world is through flowers and their meanings.

Now eighteen and emancipated from the system, Victoria has nowhere to go and sleeps in a public park, where she plants a small garden of her own. Soon a local florist discovers her talents, and Victoria realizes she has a gift for helping others through the flowers she chooses for them. But a mysterious vendor at the flower market has her questioning what’s been missing in her life, and when she’s forced to confront a painful secret from her past, she must decide whether it’s worth risking everything for a second chance at happiness.



‘Do you really think you’re the only human being alive who is unforgivably flawed? Who’s been hurt almost to the point of breaking?’ - Renata
Vanessa Diffenbaugh, The Language of Flowers



Insight on THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS from the author...

"The Victorian language of flowers began with the publication of Le Language des Fleurs, written by Charlotte de Latour and printed in Paris in 1819. To create the book--which was a list of flowers and their meanings--de Latour gathered references to flower symbolism throughout poetry, ancient mythology and even medicine. The book spawned the science known as floriography, and between 1830 and 1880, hundreds of similar floral dictionaries were printed in Europe and America.
In The Language of Flowers, Victoria learns about this language as a young girl from her prospective adoptive mother Elizabeth. Elizabeth tells her that years ago, people communicated through flowers; and if a man gave a young lady a bouquet of flowers, she would race home and try to decode it like a secret message. So he would have to choose his flowers carefully." - Vanessa Diffenbaugh


"Instantly enchanting…. [Diffenbaugh] is the best new writer of the year." -Elle

"A fascinating debut…. Diffenbaugh clearly knows both the human heart and her plants, and she keeps us rooting for the damaged Victoria." -O Magazine

"We couldn't put it down."--Good Housekeeping



The story starts where we meet Victoria at 18 just getting out of the foster care system. There is a lot she couldn't count on life, but the beauty of flowers gives her a certain peace. She's bit of an odd duck. She doesn't exactly communicate well with others. She does better as a solo act, so to speak. You will find her story heartbreaking and real. Giving you an insight of what goes on in the foster care system

A certain suspense unfolds for the reader, wondering if Victoria can overcome her childhood pain. 

Of course, the author has a magical way of adding the "flower" information into the story as well. This novel is on of booklist out there. Its a novel that has a lot to offer, and you'll be glad that you read about this character that Diffenbaugh has created.


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